10th International Conference on Applied Cryptography and Network Security (ACNS '12)

June 26-29, 2012, Singapore



Keynote


Applied Cryptography and Network Security
     - 10 years in the past and 10 years in the future

ABSTRACT:
     Technology has been evolving fast, and we are in the middle of a paradigm shift in computing. This implies changes and advances in information security technology, which are needed in order to cope with new ways by which attackers can exploit emerging systems. ACNS is a young conference which started a decade ago in order to cover the integration of all security technologies to secure networks and systems. I will review the changes in security and cryptographic applications, what has been going on, and what are possible directions for future advances, and at least what seems to be needed to make systems more useful, reliable and cost effective.

BIOGRAPHY:
     Dr. Moti Yung is a Research Scientist with Google Inc. and an Adjunct Senior Research Faculty at the Computer Science Department, Columbia University. Before that he was a member of IBM Research and a consultant to leading companies and governments, including RSA Laboratories. His main research interests are in the areas of Security, Cryptography and Privacy, as well as in Distributed Computing Algorithms, and related areas in Computer Science. In the last 30 years he has been working on, both, central issues in the scientific foundations and theory, as well as on crucial industrial solutions, and he has published over 400 works. In 2010 Moti delivered the annual IACR's Distinguished Lecture in Cryptography.

Slides

Cloud Computing Infrastructure Security

ABSTRACT:
     Cloud computing is emerging as a promising solution to Information Technology (IT) management to both ease the provisioning and administration of complex hardware and software systems and reduce the operational costs. Several industry and university leaders have started to offer cloud computing services, including Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), DropBox, RackSpace, and NC State Virtual Computing Lab (VCL). With the industry's continuous investment, cloud computing is likely to be a major component of the future IT solution, which will have significant impact on almost all sectors of society. The trustworthiness of cloud computing is thus critical to the well-being of all organizations or individuals that will rely on cloud computing for their IT solutions.
     In this talk, I will discuss new threats to cloud computing, present a new security architecture for compute clouds, and describe a few research results aimed at securing the infrastructure of future compute clouds.

BIOGRAPHY:
     Dr. Peng Ning is a Professor of Computer Science at NC State University, where he also serves as the Technical Director for Secure Open Systems Initiative (SOSI). He is a recipient of National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award in 2005. He is currently the Secretary of ACM Special Interest Group on Security, Auditing, and Control (SIGSAC), and is on the Executive Committee of ACM SIGSAC. He is an editor for Springer Briefs in Computer Science, responsible for Briefs on information security. He has served or is serving on the editorial boards of several international journals, including ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, Journal of Computer Security, Ad-Hoc Networks, Ad-Hoc & Sensor Wireless Networks: An Intertional Journal, and IET Proceedings Information Security. He also served or is serving as the Program (Co-)Chairs of ACM SASN '05, ICICS '06, ESORICS '09, NDSS '13, the General Chair of ACM CCS '07 & '08, and Program Vice Chair for ICDCS '09 & '10 -- Security and Privacy Track. He served on the Steering Committee of ACM CCS from 2007 to 2011, and is a founding Steering Committee member of ACM WiSec. His research has been supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), Army Research Office (ARO), the Advanced Research and Development Activity (ARDA), IBM Research, SRI International, and the NCSU/Duke Center for Advanced Computing and Communication (CACC).

Slides

JH in the NIST Hash Function Competition

ABSTRACT:
     The NIST SHA-3 hash function competition started in year 2008 with 64 candidates being submitted. The competition is now in the final round, and there are five finalists: Blake, Grostl, JH, Keccak and Skein. In this talk, I will talk about the hash function design strategy and the comparison of the five finalists. The detailed design rationale of hash function JH will be presented.

BIOGRAPHY:
     Hongjun is a Nanyang Assistant Professor at the School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. He received his BEng (1st class honors) and MEng degrees from the National University of Singapore, and his PhD degree from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. He has broken more than 20 ciphers, and he is the designer of stream cipher HC and hash function JH.

Slides